The market is not such a clear-cut transition from network-to-network: with Myspace it was simpler because the idea of active participation and community engagement was something only embraced by the youth who used the most idiotic of html layouts.  With Facebook, the user-base has changed.  The service is widely used and the reluctance of change is more heartfelt by a wider age range of audiences.  Habits of use amongst social consumers has altered from the local hierachical status of 'returning home to talk on Myspace,' to an interconnectivity that can follow you through your life.

Simply put, the idea of having to choose is insane in a time when we are metaphorically juggling the curations of many online personas that we put forward.  Infographics, such as the one below, connotate that we have to choose one or the other, that when it comes to the groups of 'friends' (in quotes because the definition of friend alters a bit when speaking of social networking) we speak to, we are only allowed a singular; but hasn't anybody thought that we could just choose both?  No?  Because there obviously isn't a grey area when it comes to social communication...

I am the Founder and Editor-in-chief of New Rising Media. You can follow me on Twitter @MrJasonEngland.